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October 2014

Conservation Connection October 2014

NOTE: All links have been removed from this archived newsletter. For more information on any topics mentioned, please use our website Search bar above.

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In this issue:

  • I-90 Wolf Meeting
  • Member Survey
  • Fisher Comments
  • Fall Newsletter
  • Best of Western WA
  • Bear Safety Blog


Conflict avoidance tools like range riders can work if given the chance. Photo: Chase Gunnell

Conflict avoidance tools like range riders can work if given the chance.
Photo: Chase Gunnell


 

 







Speak up for Washington's Wolves

 

During the past few months, our state has hit some speed bumps when it comes to safeguarding wolf recovery in a way that works for both people and these iconic native predators.

First it was the Huckleberry Pack conflict. Then just this week, we saw the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW) host a public meeting in Colville where they heard testimony that poison and poaching are the only way to manage wolves.

This coming Tuesday, October 14th from 6:00 to 9:00 p.m. WDFW will host a second public meeting on wolf management in Room 1EF of the Lynnwood Convention Center. We're asking you to attend and speak up for a future in Washington that includes successful ranches, prosperous agriculture, and healthy wolf populations.

You'll find suggested talking points and more information on our website. We'll see you there!

 

 

 

Member support is how we keep the Northwest wild. Photo: Chase Gunnell

Member support is how we keep the Northwest wild.
Photo: Chase Gunnell

 

Members: Please Complete our 2014 Survey

 

If you haven't done so already, please complete our 2014 Member Survey. Member support is critically important to our work, and we want to know how we're doing!

You can complete the Member Survey online at www.surveymonkey.com/s/cnwmember or call our Bellingham office at 360.671.9950 if you would like to receive a paper copy.

As we embark upon long-term strategic planning, we are interested in hearing about your conservation interests, outdoor priorities and how we can communicate and serve you better. We would appreciate it if you could take a few minutes to let us know what you think.

Thank you for your valuable input on our planning process, and for your continued support of Conservation Northwest.

 

 

 

Fishers were historically abundant in the Cascades. Photo: David Moskowitz

Fishers were historically abundant in the Cascades.
Photo: David Moskowitz

 

 

 

 

Oct. 15th Comment Deadline for Fisher Recovery

 

In an effort to restore the fisher to its historic range in the Cascade Mountains, the National Park Service is proposing to partner with WDFW to reintroduce this native species to Mount Rainier National Park and the North Cascades National Park Service Complex.

Please show your support for recovering fishers in the Cascades by submitting a comment.

It's unlikely fishers will be able to recolonize the Cascades on their own. But recent successful reintroduction efforts in Olympic National Park provide hope that the recovery plans proposed for the North Cascades and Mount Rainier will be successful.

For more information and for a sample comment letter, please visit our website.

 

 

 

B.C. grizzly bear cubs featured on the cover of our Fall Newsletter. Photo: Jeremy Williams

B.C. grizzly bear cubs featured on the cover of our Fall Newsletter.
Photo: Jeremy Williams

 

 

 

 

Conservation Northwest Quarterly is in the mail

 

We are pleased to announce that the latest edition of our Conservation Northwest Quarterly newsletter should be hitting mailboxes next week. If you're not a Conservation Northwest member, or want to get a jump on the print version, you can also find a copy online.

This season's newsletter focuses on the need for secure, connected habitat in order for wildlife to thrive, featuring our cross-border work through the Coast to Cascades Grizzly Bear Initiative.

You'll also find updates on our range riders program, new partnerships in Okanogan County, North Cascades grizzly bear news, a predator science panel we're hosting, and a perspective on how the Carlton Fire impacted Methow Valley wildlife. And of course, awesome animal photos from our Citizen Wildlife Monitoring Project and much more.

Want to receive full-color print editions of our quarterly newsletter? Sign up to become a member or contact us for a complimentary copy.

 

 

 

Vote for us as Best Favorite Local Charity in the Best of Western Washington contest!

Vote for us as Best Favorite Local Charity in the Best of Western Washington contest!


 

 

 

Best of Western Washington Contest

 

Did you know Conservation Northwest is in the running for Best Favorite Local Charity in KING5 and Evening Magazine's Best of Western Washington contest?

Cast your vote today for keeping the Northwest wild!

This annual contest attracts attention across the Puget Sound Region, and in 2009 we made it into the Top 5 for local charity organizations.

Voting online is easy and takes only a few seconds. The contest ends Friday, October 24th. If you really want to help us make it into the Top 5 again, please share our contest page on Facebook or Twitter!

 

 

 

Grizzly bears warrant caution, but they're far from the deadliest thing outdoors. Photo: Dana Base / WDFW

Grizzly bears warrant caution, but they're far from the deadliest thing outdoors.
Photo: Dana Base / WDFW


 

 

10 Things More Likely to kill you than Grizzly Bears

 

It is any hiker's worst nightmare: a 600-pound, hungry grizzly bear, right?

Wrong. Despite their fearsome reputation, grizzly bears are omnivores and feed mostly on nuts, berries, roots and insects. And those fearsome claws? They're used mainly for ripping up roots, anthills and other favorite foods including cow parsnip, mushrooms, moths and termites.

Grizzlies may be an umbrella species that deserves our respect and caution, but humans are notably not on a grizzly bear's natural menu.

Instead of worrying about a gory mauling, here are ten things you may encounter outdoors that are more likely to kill you than a grizzly bear.

 

 

 

 

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