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March 2015

Conservation Connection March 2015

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In this issue:

  • Auction 2015
  • Art Contest
  • Staff Changes
  • Ranching & Grizz
  • Murrelet Victory
  • Wolf Count


Photo from last year's auction by Alex Crooks.

Photo from last year's auction by Alex Crooks.


 

 







Hope for a Wild Future Auction and Dinner Wednesday

 

Our annual Hope for a Wild Future auction and dinner is coming up Wednesday, April 1st and it's no joke--we have been seriously working to put together one of the best auctions yet!

Learn more about this year's event in this Scat! blog post from our auction staff.

Can't join us this year? You can still support our conservation community by making a donation or becoming a Conservation Northwest member for just $35 a year. Your gifts keep the Northwest wild.

 

 

 

K-12 students, put your creative side to work and enter the #?iHearti90Willdife social media art contest.

K-12 students, put your creative side to work and enter the #iHearti90Wildlife social media art contest.

 

Bridging Futures Art Contest: I Heart I-90 Wildlife

 

Calling K-12 students! Put your creative side to work and enter the #iHearti90Wildlife social media art contest, hosted by Bridging Futures 2015: I Heart I-90 Wildlife, WSDOT, and the I-90 Wildlife Bridges Coalition led by Conservation Northwest.

Get all the details and more ways to enter on our webpage.

Students are encouraged to illustrate the wildlife that will benefit from I-90's first-ever wildlife bridge. Then post a photo of your art on Instagram or on the Bridging Futures 2015 Facebook or Twitter pages with the hashtag #iHearti90Wildlife for a chance to win great prizes like a GoPro HERO camera!

 

 

 

New Development and Communications Director Jeff Baierlein.

New Development and Communications Director Jeff Baierlein.

 

 

 

 

Changes on the Conservation Northwest Team

 

We've had some big changes on our staff this month, with a fond farewell to former Development Director Chris Clark, a changing role for Jasmine Minbashian, now Special Projects Director based in the Methow Valley, and a warm welcome to Jeff Baierlein, our new Development and Communications Director in Seattle.

Read more about the changes on the Conservation Northwest team and get to know Jeff in our latest Scat! blog post.

Jeff brings 26 years of experience with environmental and wilderness organizations and his background is in nonprofit leadership, fundraising, education and advocacy.

 

 

 

Grizzly bear in Idaho. Photo: IDFG

Grizzly bear in Idaho.
Photo: IDFG

 

 

 

 

Ranchers, Grizzly Bears and the North Cascades

 

With the announcement of long-awaited planning for North Cascades grizzly bear restoration, we've dusted off a classic documentary-style film: Ranching and Grizzly Bears.

In producing this video, we traveled to Montana to meet with ranchers, farmers and expert wildlife managers to see how livestock operators in other states are using bear awareness and straightforward precautions to successfully coexist with recovering grizzly bear populations.

Learn more about the video and what we learned making it in this Scat! blog post from Joe Scott, International Conservation Director.

 

 

 

Marbled Murrelet. Photo: Rick and Nora Bowers/Audubon

Marbled Murrelet.
Photo: Rick and Nora Bowers/Audubon


 

 

 

A Victory for Murrelets and Old-growth

 

We had a big win for marbled murrelet and old-growth forest protections this month! With Earthjustice and other partners, we won an appeal in the Washington D.C. Circuit Court that rejects yet another attempt by the timber industry to eliminate protections for these threatened seabirds' and the ancient forests they need to survive.

"The marbled murrelet's coastal old-growth habitat is known the world around for its biological treasures," said Dave Werntz, our Science and Conservation Director. "This court ruling ensures the murrelet and its old forest habitat have a shot at recovery."

 

 

 

Lookout Pack wolf photographed by our remote camera program. Photo: CNW

Lookout Pack wolf photographed by our remote camera program.
Photo: CNW


 

 

Washington's Wolf Population Grew in 2014

 

New survey results released this month by the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife show Washington's wolf population is now at least 68 wolves, up from 52 wolves confirmed at the end of 2013. We had at least 16 wolf packs and five successful breeding pairs at the end of last year.

We're excited to hear that Washington's wolves are continuing their natural recovery despite some setbacks last year.

As our state's wolf numbers grow, the need for enforcement and self-policing to combat poaching, as well as the continued adoption of conflict avoidance methods by livestock operators, is going to become even more essential in order to meet statewide wolf recovery goals and achieve successful coexistence.

We're committed to helping implement effective strategies to reduce conflicts between wolves, livestock and people. We're also supportive of studies to better understand the impacts wolves are having or not having on our state's important deer, elk and moose herds.

Our goal is for Washington to be the state where wolf recovery works; for people, wolves and all our native wildlife. With hard work and collaboration, that goal is still achievable.

 

 

 

 

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